Welcome to the archives of prevoius Image for the Asking selections.

Click on a month on the right to see the images for that month.

Saturday, 11 August 2018 22:24

A Marbling We Will Go

From Cedar Point Overlook looking across an abyss hardly more than a thousand feet wide into a solid wall of gneiss marbled with nearly horizontal bands of pegmatite, it is almost impossible to believe that a canyon over 2250' in depth lies directly in between. But, then, there are many aspects of Black Canyon of the Gunnison and its National Park that seem to invite disbelief. I was last here in 1974, when this majestic public treasure was still classified as a national monument (1933); and standing wide-mouthed above the seemingly bottomless gash of a gorge below me, I found it hard to fathom, in the waning afternoon light, why it had taken so long for me to return.

A focal length of 40mm, right on the edge of "normal," gave me the angle of view I wanted. An aperture of f/20 provided depth-of-field, and a shutter speed of 1/6 second at ISO 100 gave me an overall slightly darker-than-medium exposure.

The Gunnison is the second largest river in Colorado and the largest tributary of the Colorado wholly within the State of Colorado. For more than two million years, it has gnawed relentlessly at the igneous walls that bind it. In the end the river will chew its way to freedom.

 

Friday, 03 August 2018 22:55

Courthouse Morning

From a small area just north of the La Sal Mountains Viewpoint in Arches National Park, Sheep Rock and the side of The Organ closely frame the more distant, cottonwood-filled opening of Courthouse Wash, behind which rises the imposing southern expanse of The Great Wall. It seems to me that such views are the quintessential expression of the Colorado Plateau; not iconic, just red rock in its awesome beauty. Add in some of July's textured stratocumulus, and I can easily imagine Edward Abbey penning, "Wilderness is not a luxury, but a necessity of the human spirit, as vital to our lives as water and good bread."

A focal length of 150mm from half-a-mile away gave me the angle-of-view I wanted, given the framing elements and amount of sky I had chosen. An aperture of f/20 provided depth-of-field, and a shutter speed of 1/10 of a second at ISO 200 gave me an overall medium exposure.

The early morning light shining across Entrada Sandstone always seems the suggest that stone is glowing from within.

 

Friday, 29 June 2018 23:05

Relativity and Mostly Solid Rock

In all of the years I/we have been visiting Acadia, we had somehow never managed to find our way over to Schoodic Peninsula, a separate unit of the Park on the eastern side of Frenchman Bay, due East of Great Head about an hour away from Southwest Harbor by car, and actually part of the mainland. It is a geologist's Eden, a massive slope of pink granite, fractured by interval intrusions of black diabase - an igneous rock similar to basalt - which weather differentially and encourage fountains of spray to erupt from the creviced rock.

Schoodic is such a convoluted landscape that I wanted to play a bit with perspective.. The rise in the granite (mid-ground) above the shelf is only about 15", but by placing the camera even with the top of the step-up and being lower down on the shelf, the step up was rendered as a much more looming presence. A focal length of 24mm, solid wide-angle, gave me the angle-of-view I wanted. An aperture of f/20 provided depth-of-field, and a shutter speed of 1/20th of a second at ISO 100 gave me an overall slightly-lighter-than-medium exposure. Some of the balsam fir trees along the apex of the point top out around 50'.

I feel certain that our first visit to Schoodic will somehow not be our last.

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